Subway (Luc Besson, 1985)

Nikita (Luc Besson, 1990)

Fun.

(Source: caucasianmale, via krzysztofkieslowski)

brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue:Karina Wolf on Lost in America (1985):

"Only people who haven’t experienced crippling need could throw away advantages so blithely. Dropping out suggests assurance in your own resources. It connotes not just sufficiency, but overabundance. Other generations had no choice about their compromises. 
Anxiety, David’s hallmark, is the product of uncertainty but also of hope. His is a conflict of the 1980s, when after a long recession, there was an itch to think about ‘happiness’ and ‘fulfillment’ along with an urge for middle-class stability. The Americans that David and Linda meet on the road don’t suffer the same doubts, because they aren’t gifted with the same opportunities. Does being poor make you honest? No, it just means you have fewer comforts and fewer options. 
And maybe this is all to say that Lost In America, with its very different and tempered resolution (in which David and Linda long to reclaim their much-interrogated status quo), teaches the same lessons that Easy Rider does more darkly: freedom and itinerancy demand a heavy price, and maybe that’s too terrible to bear.”

To read the rest of this essay, download the Bright Wall/Dark Room app to your iPhone or iPad for free, or subscribe online for $2 to receive immediate access to the entire issue on your computer.

brightwalldarkroom:

Excerpt from the new issue:Karina Wolf on Lost in America (1985):

"Only people who haven’t experienced crippling need could throw away advantages so blithely. Dropping out suggests assurance in your own resources. It connotes not just sufficiency, but overabundance. Other generations had no choice about their compromises. 

Anxiety, David’s hallmark, is the product of uncertainty but also of hope. His is a conflict of the 1980s, when after a long recession, there was an itch to think about ‘happiness’ and ‘fulfillment’ along with an urge for middle-class stability. The Americans that David and Linda meet on the road don’t suffer the same doubts, because they aren’t gifted with the same opportunities. Does being poor make you honest? No, it just means you have fewer comforts and fewer options. 

And maybe this is all to say that Lost In America, with its very different and tempered resolution (in which David and Linda long to reclaim their much-interrogated status quo), teaches the same lessons that Easy Rider does more darkly: freedom and itinerancy demand a heavy price, and maybe that’s too terrible to bear.”

To read the rest of this essay, download the Bright Wall/Dark Room app to your iPhone or iPad for free, or subscribe online for $2 to receive immediate access to the entire issue on your computer.

Who The Hell Is Sonia Rykiel - Malcolm McLaren (feat. Sonia Rykiel)

I heard this song playing in a cafe for the first time since 1995.

image

illustration:  Brianna Ashby

BWDR Issue #14:  Americana  Into The Blue Again

The hero of Albert Brooks’ Lost In America, David Howard, is a mid-career adman enamored of Dennis Hopper’s dropouts in Easy Rider, and the spirit of these post-industrial cowboys informs David’s journey. 

The ideals and imagery of Easy Rider remain potent – creator Dennis Hopper and his fellow actors, Peter Fonda and Jack Nicholson, remain the bellwether for any aspirant to counter-culture. Their attitude remains appealingly defiant, boyishly insurgent. There’s something about riding cross-country on a motorcycle that says you’re going your own way. 

New film cricketisms for July.
brightwalldarkroom:

The July issue is NOW AVAILABLE!
This month’s theme is Americana, with brand new essays on Boyhood, Blue Velvet, The Last Picture Show, Friday Night Lights, Far from Heaven, Lost in America, and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, as well as a poem inspired by Badlands.

New film cricketisms for July.

brightwalldarkroom:

The July issue is NOW AVAILABLE!

This month’s theme is Americana, with brand new essays on Boyhood, Blue Velvet, The Last Picture Show, Friday Night Lights, Far from Heaven, Lost in America, and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, as well as a poem inspired by Badlands.