I had been warned that Deneuve is like a barometer on a set; when she is not pleased with the film she is stormy. She tends to be hypercritical, to sit in judgment, but here she was radiant, unapproachably beautiful and yet joking with the technicians. She was the girl who walks into a room to have every man present fall in love with her on the spot. One of the script-girls, a drab, average woman, had a scarf tied to her waist, and Deneuve asked, “Is that so you won’t forget something?” and the scripts-girl said, “It’s so I won’t forget I exist.” The barometer was set at sunny and fair. I later saw a rumor published in Paris Match that the good feelings between her and Truffaut were more than professional. Belmondo stopped sparring with a technician long enough to say that “Truffaut’s great with actors. He’s like a good fight manager; he only talks to you when it’s important.”
Homo Cinematicus

I had been warned that Deneuve is like a barometer on a set; when she is not pleased with the film she is stormy. She tends to be hypercritical, to sit in judgment, but here she was radiant, unapproachably beautiful and yet joking with the technicians. She was the girl who walks into a room to have every man present fall in love with her on the spot. One of the script-girls, a drab, average woman, had a scarf tied to her waist, and Deneuve asked, “Is that so you won’t forget something?” and the scripts-girl said, “It’s so I won’t forget I exist.” The barometer was set at sunny and fair. I later saw a rumor published in Paris Match that the good feelings between her and Truffaut were more than professional. Belmondo stopped sparring with a technician long enough to say that “Truffaut’s great with actors. He’s like a good fight manager; he only talks to you when it’s important.”

Homo Cinematicus

Spellbound (1945)

brightwalldarkroom:

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SHRINKING THE SPOTLESS MIND

by Karina Wolf

 There are many modalities of therapy, but traditionally, a chief element is listening.  Not an easy practice to bring to the screen. The shrink lends himself well enough to certain genres: the fish out of water (Analyze This); the melodrama (Another Woman); quite commonly, and often quite poorly, the thriller (Don’t Say A Word).  Spellbound falls into this last category, and though its director was dismissive (“it’s just another manhunt story wrapped in pseudo-psychology”), the film fits neatly within his cinematic project.  As an auteur, Hitchcock exposes the vice beneath virtue, the menace that threatens the veneer of civility; so does psychoanalysis, particularly as portrayed in Spellbound.

(Source: brightwalldarkroom)

Der General poster (Buster Keaton & Clyde Bruckman, 1926) in 2 or 3 choses que je sais d’elle (JLG, 1967)

The Triplets of Belleville - (Sylvain Chomet, 2003)
Bruno is a very thoughtfully illustrated dog.

The Triplets of Belleville - (Sylvain Chomet, 2003)

Bruno is a very thoughtfully illustrated dog.

Mauvais Sang - (Leos Carax, 1986)

Purple Life Mixtape

Dave Wrangler & @DJAlykhan - 90 minute mix of hits, b-sides, 12” edits and cassette single rarities.

A track from Cliff Martinez’s score for The Knick.  

I love that Soderbergh uses Martinez’s work on a period show (along with his ambient work for futuristic Solaris).

The Philadelphia Story (1940)

brightwalldarkroom:

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A SLAP ON THE BACK AND HEAVY MIST BEFORE THE EYES

by Karina Wolf

Katharine Hepburn is perfect for the part. Her Tracy Lord is the embodiment of Yankee privilege – sporty, lean, self-reliant, and imperious.

(Source: brightwalldarkroom)

Subway (Luc Besson, 1985)