Role model.

Role model.

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The Making Of The Great Beauty

Don’t hanglide over a volcano.

Don’ts - David Shrigley Late Night Tales

what on Earth is it about?

what on Earth is it about?

(Source: againbeholdthestars, via burningfp)

David Grossman - The Art of Fiction No. 194

  • Grossman: Writing allows me to explore situations that are impossible for me to explore in my life. And yet they are very active parts in me. Emotionally I am an extreme person, and writing makes it possible for me to go on.
  • Jonathan Shainin: What do you mean by extreme?
  • Grossman: Intense, not afraid of extremity in other people, intrigued by the interior lives of other people, especially in the suppressed places. I’m always questioning what I observe. All the time I see the cracks, wherever I look—even before what happened to me. It’s a way of seeing, and I cannot say I chose it, but I surrendered to it quite happily because I think it’s an accurate view of the fragility of life. Anything that is calm and safe seems to me like an illusion.

thedeathoffilm:

TRAILER: “BIRDMAN” (Alejandro González Iñárritu) 2014

"How did we end up here, in this dump?"

Iñárritu’s career could go any number of ways from here, but this *terrific* glimpse at his first (predominately) english-language feature suggests that it might be to the skies. 

This is going to be terrific:  Michael Keaton, Galifianakis, Ed Norton, Emma Stone, Naomi Watts, Andrea Riseborough.  Lensed by Chivo.

(Source: truthandmovies)

Hal - Yasmine Hamdan (from Only Lovers Left Alive)

Viva La Libertà (Roberto Andò, 2013)

Lincoln Center hosts Open Roads, a showcase of new Italian cinema, right now. Like many of the festival’s entries, Viva la libertà is a critique of Italy’s decaying political regimes.  In this case, the approach is farce, and the plot lifted from identity swap comedies like Dave and The Parent Trap.   When politician Enrico abruptly leaves his post, his mad twin brother Giovanni fills in.  Giovanni’s brazen bipolar honesty finds immediate popularity, while his depressive brother, unburdened by public scrutiny, revisits a past love in France.  The matter at hand is personal and professional transparency.
The dual role of twin brothers — errant politician and labile professor lately released from the madhouse — is perfect for Toni Servillo, who is astonishingly distinct in every appearance.  Servillo does not employ the broad colors of a character actor, or the shimmering virtuosity of a professional chameleon like Peter Sellars.


Rather, Servillo is cloaked by nuance. His voice’s register and tone, his face, his hair, his comportment are anchored in distinct and believable personal histories— every time.  A fair number of Servillo’s films are available to watch in the US. Very few hallmarks link these performances.  There’s a balletic physical presence that Servillo uses to telegraph elegance and sophistication; his sincerity, which is an absence of hypocrisy, sorely needed in the stories he tells; and then there are his eyes, great registers of humanity that make the audience feel as though Servillo has seen and digested all emotional experience. 

Viva La Libertà (Roberto Andò, 2013)

Lincoln Center hosts Open Roads, a showcase of new Italian cinema, right now. Like many of the festival’s entries, Viva la libertà is a critique of Italy’s decaying political regimes.  In this case, the approach is farce, and the plot lifted from identity swap comedies like Dave and The Parent Trap.   When politician Enrico abruptly leaves his post, his mad twin brother Giovanni fills in.  Giovanni’s brazen bipolar honesty finds immediate popularity, while his depressive brother, unburdened by public scrutiny, revisits a past love in France.  The matter at hand is personal and professional transparency.

The dual role of twin brothers — errant politician and labile professor lately released from the madhouse — is perfect for Toni Servillo, who is astonishingly distinct in every appearance.  Servillo does not employ the broad colors of a character actor, or the shimmering virtuosity of a professional chameleon like Peter Sellars.

Rather, Servillo is cloaked by nuance. His voice’s register and tone, his face, his hair, his comportment are anchored in distinct and believable personal histories— every time.  A fair number of Servillo’s films are available to watch in the US. Very few hallmarks link these performances.  There’s a balletic physical presence that Servillo uses to telegraph elegance and sophistication; his sincerity, which is an absence of hypocrisy, sorely needed in the stories he tells; and then there are his eyes, great registers of humanity that make the audience feel as though Servillo has seen and digested all emotional experience. 

mastersofhorror:

"Come, follow me. We shall become one soul, one blood. Follow me. Death is waiting…"

Vampyr (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1932)

(via clairedenis)